What is wrong with Akshay Kumar starred- Raksha Bandhan

Raksha Bandhan is a movie which is virtuous and yet demeaning to its own cause. It’s a living irony with the story plot created to focus on a societal issue but is ending up exaggerating and normalizing what shouldn’t be normalized in the first place. The story revolves around a man, who owns a chaat shop in Chandni chowk, which is known since years to be selling gol gappas that help women bear sons. The man, embodied in Akshay Kumar, lives with his four sisters who are still to be married, and as per his dying mother wishes, he can’t marry until each and every sister of his are married off, thus bearing a huge pressure on him and his childhood sweetheart, played by Bhumi Pednekar, for arranging dowry for each one of them. The projection of the brother and sister relationship is like any other, based on the patriarchal norms of brother being the protector and saviour of his sisters, while the sister being the obedient ones. It’s the portrayal of the sisters that strikes anyone who would want to question the role of Bollywood in promotion of something that shouldn’t be promoted in name of showing a cause.


The sisters in the film can be easily ranked from best to worst in accordance with the societal favourability lens, the most favoured one, the first one to get married, being the most appropriate in every way, she is feminine, right weight, perfect colour, knows how to cook and do all the house chores, while all the other are the worst one because of the contrary characteristics against the eldest one. What makes this movie unusual is its normalization of this unfavorability our society has towards women who do not fit into their realm of “perfect”. Showing women continuously as a burden, no matter how much a brother loves his sisters but has to marry them off and continuously struggle to arrange dowry for each one of them for those hungry men out there who can easily put a price on a women and make the marital bond a business deal.


The sisters in the film can be easily ranked from best to worst in accordance with the societal favourability lens, the most favoured one, the first one to get married, being the most appropriate in every way, she is feminine, right weight, perfect colour, knows how to cook and do all the house chores, while all the other are the worst one because of the contrary characteristics against the eldest one. What makes this movie unusual is its normalization of this unfavorability our society has towards women who do not fit into their realm of “perfect”. Showing women continuously as a burden, no matter how much a brother loves his sisters but has to marry them off and continuously struggle to arrange dowry for each one of them for those hungry men out there who can easily put a price on a women and make the marital bond a business deal.


Bollywood and its unexperienced characters, it is a toxic love story, and with someone like Akshay Kumar as the lead character who takes barely a month or two to complete a movie, without any effort to study the kind of impact it might have, it can be dangerous to the overall impact it can have, as in order to showcase the right’s, wrongs are need to be portrayed, but a lack of understanding and unequal emphasis is what makes this another failed attempt by Bollywood

 

The views and opinions expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Brief Bulletin.

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